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MRC Epidemiology Unit : Data Sharing

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Traffic and Health in Glasgow Study Level Descriptors

Name:
Traffic and Health in Glasgow Study

Parent study:
Scientific title: Health impacts of the M74 urban motorway extension: a mixed-method natural experimental study.

Other names:
Public title: Traffic and Health in Glasgow

Description:
See below (abstract)

Abstract:
Background: Making travel easier can improve people’s access to opportunities, but motor transport also incurs substantial undesirable health and social impacts.

Aims: To assess how a new urban motorway affected travel and activity patterns, road accidents and well-being in local communities, and how these impacts were experienced and brought about.

Design: The Traffic and Health in Glasgow study, a mixed-method controlled before-and-after study.

Setting: Glasgow, UK.

Participants: Repeat cross-sectional survey samples of 1345 and 1343 adults, recruited in 2005 and 2013 respectively. Of these, 365 formed a longitudinal cohort; 196 took part in a quantitative sub-study using accelerometers and global positioning system receivers; and 30, living within 400m of the new motorway, took part in a qualitative sub-study along with 12 other informants. Complementary analyses used police STATS19 road traffic accident data (1997-2014) and Scottish Household Survey travel diaries (2009-2013).

Intervention: A new five-mile, six-lane section of the M74 motorway, opened in 2011 and running through predominantly deprived neighbourhoods in southeastern Glasgow, with associated changes to the urban landscape.

Main outcome measures: Differences in self-reported travel behaviour (one-day travel record), physical activity (short IPAQ) and well-being (SF-8 and SWEMWBS), and in the incidence of road traffic accidents.

Methods: A combination of multivariable cohort, cross-sectional, repeat cross-sectional and interrupted time-series regression analyses comparing residents of the ‘M74 corridor’ intervention area and two matched control areas, complemented by novel qualitative spatial methods. Graded measures of the proximity of the motorway to each participant’s home served as a further basis for controlled comparisons.

Locations:

Glasgow, UK

Keywords:
Environment, infrastructure, motorway, natural experimental study, physical activity, road traffic casualties, travel behaviour, well-being

Research areas:
Public health, environmental interventions

Research purposes:
To assess the impacts of a new motorway on local residents’ behaviour and health, with the aim to help inform future policy and planning.

Population:
Adults aged 16 years or over living in one of three local study areas in Glasgow: the ‘M74 corridor’ intervention area (‘South’); an area surrounding the existing M8 motorway (‘East’); or an area with no comparable major road infrastructure (‘North’).

Status:
Study is completed.

Recruitment:
2013: Core follow-up survey of local residents

2014-15: Quantitative sub-study of 196 survey participants using accelerometers and global positioning system receivers

2014-15: Qualitative sub-study with 30 survey participants and 12 other key informants

Start date:
January 2013

End date:
July 2016

Follow up
A baseline postal survey was administered in 2005. A follow-up postal survey was administered in 2013.


Identifiers:

Identifier
Description
MRC Identifier (R Number)
R111209141

Approvals required:

Approval
Details
Ref FM01304
Core Survey: approved by the University of Glasgow Faculty of Medicine Ethics Committee at baseline
Ref 400120077
Core Survey: approved by the University of Glasgow Social Sciences Ethics Committee at follow-up
Ref 400130157
Objective measurement study: approved by the University of Glasgow Social Sciences Ethics Committee
Ref 400130156
Qualitative study: approved by the University of Glasgow Social Sciences Ethics Committee
Ref A10776862
Scottish Household Survey: approval for use of travel diary data for the purposes of this study granted by the Scottish Government
STATS19: data are made available for use by the Department of Transport without requiring formal approval

Funding required:

Funding
Details
Grant
National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research programme (NIHR PHR; project number 11/3005/07)

Data access:
Non-identifiable individual-level data from the core survey are available on request to the principal investigator David Ogilvie. Requests for data sharing will be considered by the principal investigator in consultation with the other investigators. Third-party researchers will need to sign a collaborative agreement.

A Data Request Form for submission to the Traffic and Health in Glasgow study is available and once completed should be sent in the first instance to datasharing@mrc-epid (or alternatively please print, complete, scan and submit using this PDF). The Unit Senior Data Manager, Adam Dickinson, will manage the processing of your data request.

Data collected:

  • Data from core surveys administered at baseline (2005) and follow-up (2013).

Sample size:
1345 (baseline) and 1343 (follow-up). Of these, 365 formed a longitudinal cohort

Sampling method:
Prior to baseline data collection, three local study areas in Glasgow were defined: an area surrounding the new M74 motorway extension (South); an area surrounding the established M8 motorway, which was built in the 1960s (East); and a control area containing a railway segment but no comparable motorway infrastructure (North). The areas were iteratively delineated in a Geographic Information System, using spatially referenced census and transport infrastructure data combined with field visits. This process ensured that the study areas had similar overall socioeconomic (e.g. levels of deprivation and unemployment, home and car ownership, and prevalence of chronic illness) and topographical characteristics, but differed in terms of containing a motorway. All areas contained a mixture of residential and other land uses, a mixture of housing stock from traditional high-density tenement housing to new developments, and other major arterial roads.

From the three defined study areas, eligible unit postcodes (the smallest unit of postal geography in the UK, corresponding to approximately 15 addresses on average) were identified and a random sample of private residential addresses was drawn from the Royal Mail Postcode Address File.

Participants were adults aged 16 years or over who responded to the postal survey delivered to their home address. If more than one householder was eligible, the individual with the most recent birthday completed the survey.

Participation type:
For the core survey, return of the questionnaire to the study team was taken as implied consent for the data to be used.

Inclusion criteria:
Participants were adults aged 16 years or over who responded to the postal survey delivered to their home address.

Exclusion criteria:

Current size:
1345 (baseline) and 1343 (follow-up). Of these, 365 formed a longitudinal cohort


Accountable people:

Role
Name (follow link for contact details)
Principal Investigator
Study Coordinator, Lead researcher
Senior Data Manager

Other investigators:

Role
Name (follow link for contact details)
Investigator
Investigator
Investigator
Investigator
Investigator
Investigator
Investigator
Investigator
Investigator
Lead researcher
Lead researcher
Lead researcher
Lead researcher

Methods of contact:
Post, Email or phone

Data sources:

  • Access overview study details by following the OVERVIEW link for a study
  • Access the details of a studies data and releases by following the RELEASE link for a study
  • Access the latest study data dictionary by following the DICTIONARY link for a study
  • Access the study questionaiires by following the QUESTIONNAIRES link for a study

Related parties:
N/A

Additional information:
N/A


Information created: 07 Mar 2017 by A Dickinson & L Foley
Information last updated: Mar 2017 by A Dickinson